SATPURA

Satpura

Over a century and a half ago, an officer of the Bengal Staff Corps found himself captivated by the Central Highlands of Madhya Pradesh. Captain James Forsyth was one of the first Europeans to explore and fall in love with Satpura. While the National Park was established in 1981, the Satpura Tiger Reserve was set up in 2000 under Project Tiger. The park is part of the government’s initiative to preserve and reclaim the dwindling forests of wild India.

The Satpura Hills run from East to West, with the Pachmarhi Plateau practically in the centre of the area at an elevation of 1,050 meters. The Satpura Tiger Reserve is 1,427 square kilometers comprising of Satpura National Park, Bori and Pachmarhi sanctuaries.

Within the Pachmarhi Biosphere Reserve, the Satpura National Park is the core zone and the remaining area serves as the buffer zone with an approximate total area of almost 5,000 square kilometers. The region is largely hilly, veined by a number of streams and nullahs that have gouged deep ravines in the land – a terrain that perfectly suits the reclusive habits of most predators. It was perhaps this charming landscape and the rich tapestry of flora and fauna that drew James Forsyth to the Central Highlands so many decades ago.

Flora

Satpura Tiger Reserve is home to coinciding habitats, transitioning between the Eastern Himalayas and Western Ghats. Both the towering Teak (Tectona grandis) and the sturdy Sal (Shorea robusta) trees exist here in harmony. The occurrence of a relict population of Sal in the predominant Teak bearing area is a rare ecological phenomenon. The Tawa Reservoir and its many streams, such as the Denwa and Sonbhadra, ensure an abundance of water, nurturing the glorious flora of the region. The forest can be broadly classified into three major types – moist deciduous, dry deciduous and central Indian subtropical hill forest. The Reserve is rich in plant diversity and ‘gene pool’ due to different climatic and edaphic factors at various altitudes. This results in luxuriant vegetation which is amongst the richest in Central India.

Common trees you will find here are Giria (Satinwood, Chloroxylon swietenia), Kusum (Schleichera oleosa), Papda (Gardenia latifolia), Khinni (Manilkara hexandra), Dhavda (Anogeissus latifolia) and of course the Mahua tree (Madhuca latifolia). You will find numerous exclusive species of epiphytic and terrestrial mosses, bryophytes and pteridophytes. The Reserve is also home to gymnosperms, and over 1,150 species of angiosperms have been reported in the area. Numerous species of angiosperms are yet to be identified.

Common trees you will find here are Giria (Satinwood, Chloroxylon swietenia), Kusum (Schleichera oleosa), Papda (Gardenia latifolia), Khinni (Manilkara hexandra), Dhavda (Anogeissus latifolia) and of course the Mahua tree (Madhuca latifolia). You will find numerous exclusive species of epiphytic and terrestrial mosses, bryophytes and pteridophytes. The Reserve is also home to gymnosperms, and over 1,150 species of angiosperms have been reported in the area. Numerous species of angiosperms are yet to be identified.

Fauna

Birds

Satpura Tiger Reserve is an ideal destination for birdwatching. The vertical scarps are home to numerous raptors like the Honey Buzzard, Black Eagle, Rufous-bellied Eagle, Shahin Falcon, Bonelli’s Eagle, Mountain Hawk Eagle and Vultures. The Grey and Red Jungle Fowl, which are found usually only in North and South India, are both found here. You can often sight the Malabar Pied Hornbill, Paradise Fly Catcher, Migrant Waterfowl, Bar-headed Goose, Pintail, Garganey, Pochard and Ruddy Shelduck. These are but a small sampling of a long list of more than 300 oft-spotted bird species. And we haven’t even begun talking about the rarer species like the Indian Skimmers and numerous wading birds which nest on the islands and mud flats created with the release of water for irrigation from the Tawa Dam.

Butterflies

The presence of numerous streams, dense foliage, wild flowers, woodland edges and damp patches attracts hordes of colorful butterflies including the Common Jezebel, Orange Oakleaf, Black Rajah, Great Eggfly, Blue Pansy etc.

Butterflies

The presence of numerous streams, dense foliage, wild flowers, woodland edges and damp patches attracts hordes of colorful butterflies including the Common Jezebel, Orange Oakleaf, Black Rajah, Great Eggfly, Blue Pansy etc.

Animals

Satpura boasts of a great concentration of leopards. Visitors are more likely to spot these sleek cats in the forest than the famed ‘Sher Khan’.

A few of our local friendlies are: Indian Bison (Gaur), Four Horned Antelope (Chausingha), Indian Giant Squirrel, Hyena, Bengal Fox, Indian Civet, Sloth Bear, Wild Dog (Dhole), Black-naped Hare and the smallest wild cat in the world – the Rusty-spotted Cat. The reptile population, especially lizards, geckos, skinks, amphibia, etc., is rampant but yet to be thoroughly studied. Submergence of the Tawa Reservoir and Denwa River provides ample habitats for fish, crocodiles and otters.

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Satpura National Park, No.14/1,
Village Bija Kheri, Sohagpur, Dist., Hoshangabad,
Sohagpur, Madhya Pradesh 461771

FOR BOOKINGS

Tel. (91) 124 4908615

Mob. (91) 98100 93312

FOR LODGE DIRECTIONS

Mob. (91) 89891 86329

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